Direkt zum InhaltDirekt zur SucheDirekt zur Navigation
▼ Zielgruppen ▼
  audience-menu

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Philosophy, Science and the Sciences

Summer semester 2019

This is a selection of courses offered by faculty of "Philosophy, Science and the Sciences" in the summer semester 2019. The regular forum for the doctoral students of the Research Training Group and the Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy is Stephen Menn's Ancient Philosophy Colloquium, complemented by the Dissertation Seminar of David Ebrey. The course list represents a variety of topics that are related to different research fields within the program. Please select your courses in accordance with your research project, your supervisors’ advice and the requirements of your curriculum.

Asper, Markus: Forschungskolloquium Gräzistik (CO)
Mo 12-14, Unter den Linden 6, room 3052, starting 15.4. (biweekly)

Aubin, Nicholas: Introduction to Arabic Philosophy (PS)
Mo 16-18, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 15 Apr.

Bjelde, Joseph: Akrasia (V)
Tue 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 9 Apr.

Bjelde, Joseph: Knowhow, understanding, and wisdom (PS)
Wed 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 10 Apr.

Bjelde, Joseph: Practical Truth (HS)
Thu 14-16, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 11 Apr.

Bjelde, Joseph: Socraticorum Reliquiae (CO)
Fri 14-16:30, Invalidenstraße 110, Unterrichtsraum, starting 12 Apr.

Ebrey, David: Dissertation Seminar
tba

Van der Eijk, Philip: Forschungskolloquium Antike Medizin- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (CO)
Mo 10-12 (s.t.), Unter den Linden 6, room 3053, starting 8 Apr.

Van der Eijk, Philip / Wilberding, James: Aristoteles als Grundleger der Wissenschaft und Philosophie des Lebens (PS)
Tue 14-16, Unter den Linden 6, room 3052, starting 9 Apr.

Gamarra Jordan / Panteri: Quod Erat Demonstrandum: The Dialogue between Philosophy and the Sciences in Ancient Greece (Q-Team)
Mo 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 15 Apr.

Graßhoff, Gerd: Grundzüge algorithmischer Wissenschaftstheorie (V)
Thu 12-14, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 11 Apr.

Graßhoff, Gerd: Wissenschaftstheoretische Texte zur Vorlesung (PS)
Tue 14-16, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 9 Apr.

Graßhoff, Gerd: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)
Mo 18-20, Hannoversche Straße 6, 1.03, starting 15 Apr.

Hildebrandt, Ronja: Schreiben und Argumentieren / Writing and Argumentation (Ü)
Tue 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 9 Apr.

Hildebrandt, Ronja: Was ist gerecht? (PS)
Tue 16-18, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 9 Apr.

Kılıç, Sinem: „Der Schlaft der Vernunft gebiert Ungeheuer.“ Zur Philosophie und Ästhetik des Traums (Q-Team)
Wed 16-18, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03, starting 10 Apr.

Lo Presti, Roberto: Aristoteles, Physik I und II (HS)
Mo 16-18, Unter den Linden 6, room 3059, starting 15 Apr.

Menn, Stephen: Ancient Philosophy (CO)
Wed 13-16, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 10 Apr.

Schmitt, Johanna: Einführung in Pyrrhonische Skepsis (PS)
Tue 12-14, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 9 Apr.

Wilberding, James: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)
Thu 13-16, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 11 Apr.

Wilberding, James: Platons Politeia (PS)
Wed 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03 starting 17 Apr.

Wilberding, James: Plato’s Timaeus (HS)
Thu 10-12, Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03, starting 11 Apr.

 

Asper, Markus: Forschungskolloquium Gräzistik (CO)

Das Kolloquium bietet eine thematisch offene Diskussionsplattform für alle, die Qualifikationsarbeiten mit gräzistischen oder gräzistik-affinen Themen schreiben oder schreiben möchten – oder die sonst über gräzistische Fragen forschen. Alle Interessierten sind herzlich eingeladen.

→Agnes

Aubin, Nicholas: Introduction to Arabic Philosophy (PS)

Between the 8th and 19th centuries, from Iberia to India, Muslim, Christian, Jewish, and even pagan and atheist philosophers composed their works in the Arabic language. Arabic replaced Greek as the language of philosophy and science, but this new Arabic philosophy (falsafa) still moved with the inertia of late-ancient Greek philosophy. In addition to translating, systematizing and refining the logical, physical, and metaphysical teachings of the First Teacher (Aristotle) and others, the philosophers of the Arabic-speaking world also had to adapt and reapply these teachings to deal with a number of philosophical and theological problems associated with monotheist creationism, among them: What kinds of proof can one have for the existence of God, or the creation of the world? What makes one argument better than another? How can one have knowledge of God’s attributes, and how can one describe God, without violating His absolute simplicity? Does God’s knowledge extend to future events, and if so, does this infringe on freewill? How can philosophers account for things like revelation or prophecy? What kinds of powers govern the heavenly and sublunar worlds?

This course will focus on the earlier half of this tradition, up until the 12th century. It will introduce representative works of major figures like al-Kindī, al-Rāzī, al-Fārābī, Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) and Ibn Rushd (Averroes). But it will also seek to contextualize these highlights by comparing them to other less commonly read works, and samples from dialectical theology (kalām). By providing a conspectus of so many different genres of works, from minor as well as a mainstream figures, this course aims to shed light on the dynamic intellectual developments taking place over these centuries, and demonstrate the centrality of falsafa within the set of sciences making up the broader Islamicate intellectual world.

No knowledge of Arabic or Islam will be assumed. Some acquaintance with themes from Greek philosophy (esp. Aristotle) will be beneficial, but not required.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Akrasia (V)

Sometimes it seems as if we do what we think or know that we should not do. At least as often, it seems as if we do things when we think or know we could do something better. What is going on inside of us, when we perform such apparently akratic actions? How, if at all, are such actions expressive of our agency? Are some such actions actually akratic? Socrates is famously said to have denied that akratic actions were possible. Plato is famously supposed to have developed a theory of the soul to explain how they were after all possible, and Aristotle has a still different treatment of akratic actions, which makes use of his insights about practical knowledge and natural science. More recent theories have renewed the puzzle, but hardly solved it. In this lecture, we'll work our way through both the ancient and contemporary debates about how to characterize and understand akrasia, what's wrong with it, and how it can be cured.This Vorlesung complements both the Hauptseminar on Practical Truth and the Proseminar on Knowing How, Understanding, and Wisdom: all three bear directly on debates about phronesis, and so on Aristotelian Ethics. Students are therefore encouraged to attend either or both of those in conjunction with this Vorlesung, though neither participation in those courses nor interest in phronesis is required.

The lectures will be in English, though questions in German are welcome.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Knowhow, understanding, and wisdom (PS)

Is knowing how to do something just a matter of knowing that something is true? Ryle famously argued that it is not. Stanley and Williamson more recently but almost as famously argued that it is. We will dig into that debate, in parallel with even more recent debates about whether understanding and wisdom are kinds of knowledge. That parallel treatment will help us get clearer not only on what knowing how, understanding, and wisdom are, but also about what is at stake in these debates. This seminar complements both the Hauptseminar on Practical Truth and the Vorlesung on Akrasia: all three bear directly on debates about phronesis, and so on Aristotelian Ethics. Students are therefore encouraged to attend either or both of those in conjunction with this seminar, though neither participation in those courses nor interest in phronesis is required.

The seminar will be primarily in English, but students are very welcome to participate in German if they prefer.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Practical Truth (HS)

Commentary tba

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Socraticorum Reliquiae (CO)

This colloquium will focus on minor Socratics, by which label I mean to exclude Plato and Xenophon, and to include both Socrates' companions as well as later authors of Sokratikoi logoi. In addition to the presentation of original research, we will jointly translate and discuss some neglected texts, starting with fragments attributed to Aeschines of Sphettus and Euclides of Megara.

MA and Doctoral students wishing to attend should email joseph.bjelde@hu-berlin.de. Some facility in ancient Greek (at a minimum, the Graecum) is required of participants.

Contributions in German are welcome, though we will translate into English.

→Agnes

Ebrey, David: Dissertation Seminar

This seminar is designed as a forum for all doctoral students of the Research Training Group “Philosophy, Science and the Sciences” and the Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy to present and discuss their work.

Van der Eijk, Philip: Forschungskolloquium Antike Medizin- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (CO)

Im Forschungskolloquium präsentieren und diskutieren Teilnehmer und Gäste laufende Forschungstätigkeiten im Bereich der antiken Medizin, Philosophie und Wissenschaftsgeschichte und ihrer Rezeption. Auch werden griechische und lateinische medizinische Texte, die im Rahmen von aktuellen Forschungsprojekten bearbeitet werden, in einem close reading Verfahren intensiv diskutiert. Da „Work in Progress“ und andere noch nicht veröffentlichte Materialien vorab zur Vorbereitung unter den Kolloquiumsteilnehmern verteilt werden, ist die Teilnahme am Kolloquium nur nach Vereinbarung mit Prof. Dr. P.J. van der Eijk (philip.van.der.eijk@hu-berlin.de) möglich.

→Agnes

Van der Eijk, Philip / Wilberding, James: Aristoteles als Grundleger der Wissenschaft und Philosophie des Lebens (PS)

Aristoteles gilt als der erste Philosoph, der systematisch und theoretisch über die Frage nach dem Ursprung und dem Wesen des Lebens nachgedacht hat. Gleichzeitig war er auch der erste Biologe, der umfangreiche empirische Forschungen im Bereich der Lebewesen und der Pflanzen veranlasst und durchgeführt hat. In seinen zoologischen Schriften bietet er zahlreiche ausführliche Beschreibungen der verschiedenen Tierarten und ihrer Körperteile und er versucht, der bunten Vielfalt der biologischen Realität variierend vom Menschen bis zur Seeanemone gerecht zu werden. Gleichzeitig bemüht er sich darum, allgemeine Erklärungen dafür zu entwickeln, warum Lebewesen so sind, wie sie sind und wie sie funktionieren.

In diesem Seminar werden wir ausgewählte Kapitel aus Aristoteles’ zoologischen Werken, seiner Abhandlung über die Seele und aus seinen kleineren naturwissenschaftlichen Schriften auf ihre Benutzung theoretischer und empirischer Elemente hin durcharbeiten und sehen, wie erstaunlich aktuell die Ansichten des Aristoteles immer wieder sind. Studierende in der klassischen Philologie werden die Texte im Original lesen.

Literatur

Aristoteles, Über die Seele, Text und übers. Klaus Corcilius, Meiner Verlag, 2017;

Aristoteles. Fünf Bücher von der Zeugung und Entwicklung der Tiere, Text und übers. H. Aubert, F. Wimmer (Nachdruck Beck, München 2014);

Aristoteles, Kleine naturwissenschaftliche Schriften, Übers. K. Dönt, Reclam, 2010;

Aristoteles, Von den Teilen der Lebewesen, Übers. Wolfgang Kullmann, Berlin 2005

Aristoteles, Historia animalium I-II, Übers. Stephan Zierlein, Berlin 2013

Armand Marie Leroi, Die Lagune oder wie Aristoteles die Naturwissenschaften erfand, Darmstadt 2017

→Agnes

Gamarra Jordan / Panteri: Quod Erat Demonstrandum: The Dialogue between Philosophy and the Sciences in Ancient Greece (Q-Team)

Sciences and Philosophy have always had a relationship of reciprocal exchange.

Philosophers have been discussing and shaping what scientific inquiry is and how it is carried out, while Scientists have called into question or verified various modes of reasoning in philosophical investigations.

This Q-Team focuses on the beginning of this relationship, meaning the dialogue between Philosophy and the Sciences in ancient Greece.

We will investigate the cross-fertilization of ideas that Philosophy has had with different scientific branches (Arithmetic, Geometry, Harmonics, Astronomy, Medicine and Biology) and vice versa. Themes that we will explore are: What is a science? What is the relationship between what our senses show us and what pure reason tells us? What constitutes scientific reasoning? We plan to explore these questions by conversing with the texts of Plato, Aristotle, Euclid, Ptolemy, Galen, etc.

No previous knowledge is necessary, although familiarity with Ancient Greek philosophy and Ancient Greek language is an asset. The course is aimed at both bachelor and master students. Undergraduates can use this opportunity to have an introductory survey of ancient Science and Philosophy – a rare opportunity. On the other hand, master students could profit from the seminar to produce a writing sample which could be used for PhD applications. Or if not, to deepen their knowledge of this fascinating topic.

The class and the readings will be in English, and since this is a Q-Team, meaning a research-based learning class, we expect students to write and present a short paper by the end of the semester. The presentation will be casual and informal – its aim is to provide the students with a taste of what it is to write and present a research paper. We plan to make this process as stress-free and helpful as possible, we will guide and support you at every stage, so we hope that you come join us!

→Agnes

Graßhoff, Gerd: Grundzüge algorithmischer Wissenschaftstheorie (V)

Die Vorlesung behandelt das weite Spektrum wissenschaftstheoretischer Themen der Rolle und Gewinnung empirischer Daten, die logische Form von Hypothesen und Theorien, begriffliche Voraussetzungen der Wissenschaften und methodologische Gesichtspunkte der Entwicklung der Wissenschaften mit den aktuellen algorithmischen Methoden des Deep Learning und des Machine Learnings. Damit ergeben sich höchst produktive Einsatzfelder wissenschaftsphilosophischer und erkenntnistheoretischer Grundkonzepte für die computergestützten Felder des wissenschaftlichen Lernens und der algorithmischen Forschungsmittel.

Es werden keine wissenschaftstheoretischen Kenntnisse oder Fertigkeiten der Programmierung vorausgesetzt. Beispiele werden in der Vorlesung als Begleitmaterialien bereitgestellt und dienen der eigenen Nachbereitung. Dieses schließt die Begleittexte ein.

→Agnes

Graßhoff, Gerd: Wissenschaftstheoretische Texte zur Vorlesung (PS)

Klassische Texte der Wissenschaftstheorie von Duhem, Popper, Hempel, Laudan, Pearl werden begleitend zur Vorlesung vorbereitend diskutiert. An Auszügen der zentralen Thesen der Wissenschaftsphilosophen werden die Konzepte eingeführt, die in der nachfolgenden Vorlesung an Beispielen vertieft werden. Der Besuch des Proseminars als Vorbereitung zur Vorlesung ist empfohlen, aber nicht erforderlich.

→Agnes

Graßhoff, Gerd: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)

Im Kolloquium zur Wissenschaftstheorie und Wissenschaftsgeschichte haben die Teilnehmer die Gelegenheit, die Ergebnisse von Studienprojekten, Hausarbeitsentwürfen und Projekten vorzustellen. In einzelnen Sitzungen werden gemeinsam aktuelle Publikationen aus dem gesamten Forschungsfeld diskutiert.

In der ersten Sitzung werden die Termine mit den Präsentationen vergeben; bitte klären Sie Ihre Themenvorschläge einen Monat vor Beginn des Semesters per E-Mail mit mir (Prof. Dr. Gerd Graßhoff) ab.

→Agnes

Hildebrandt, Ronja: Schreiben und Argumentieren / Writing and Argumentation (Ü)

In diesem Kurs werden wir üben, wie man philosophische Argumente rekonstruiert, kritisiert, selbst verfasst und eine philosophische Hausarbeit schreibt.

Studierende melden sich bitte bei der Übungsleiterin: Hildebrr@hu-berlin.de

→Agnes

Hildebrandt, Ronja: Was ist gerecht? (PS)

In diesem Seminar diskutieren wir einige der bedeutendsten Texte von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart, die sich mit Gerechtigkeit auseinandersetzen: u. a. Platon, Aristoteles, Thomas von Aquin, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Iris Marion Young und Martha Nussbaum.

Das Seminar ist historisch aufgebaut, was uns erlaubt, zu diskutieren, in welchem Kontext bestimmte Fragen der Gerechtigkeit aufkamen, welche Theorien oder Theorieelemente wiederkehrend sind, welche vergessen und welche inzwischen verworfen wurden. Dabei werden wir uns inhaltlich mit den folgenden Fragen beschäftigen: Aus welchem Grund sollen wir gerecht handeln? Wer verdient wie viel von was? Welche Verteilung von politischer Macht oder materiellen Gütern ist gerecht? Wie viel darf der Staat in unsere Freiheit eingreifen? Sind Steuern gerecht? Müssen wir Gerechtigkeit primär durch eine Analyse von Ungerechtigkeit und Diskriminierung verstehen? Kann Gerechtigkeit auch als eine Tugend begriffen werden?

Lehrsprache ist Deutsch, aber Teilnehmer*innen können sich selbstverständlich auch auf Englisch an der Diskussion beteiligen. Außerdem werden manche der Texte auf Englisch sein. Andere Sprachkenntnisse oder Vorkenntnisse sind nicht nötig.

→Agnes

Kılıç, Sinem: „Der Schlaft der Vernunft gebiert Ungeheuer.“ Zur Philosophie und Ästhetik des Traums (Q-Team)

Was sind Träume und wie entstehen sie? Warum träumen wir? Und wie lassen sich Traum und Realität voneinander unterscheiden? Denn dass das ganze Leben womöglich nur ein Traum sei – dieser alte Gedanke hat sich bis heute als Vorbehalt gegen die für unser alltägliches Denken und Handeln so selbstverständliche Annahme einer real vorgegebenen Welt erhalten. Noch lange bevor Sigmund Freud mit seiner Traumdeutung im Jahr 1899 den Traumdiskurs auf dem Gebiet der Psychoanalyse entscheidend geebnet hat, gab es bereits Auseinandersetzungen mit dem Phänomen des Traums, der in der Gesellschaft, Kultur und Religion sowohl der westlichen als auch der (mittel-/fern)östlichen Welt eine wichtige Stellung einnahm und seitdem immer wieder auf die unterschiedlichste Weise durchdacht worden ist. So findet sich bereits im Gilgamesch-Epos aus der babylonischen Zeit ein erstes Zeugnis zur Bedeutung des Traums; in der griechischen Antike wurde der Topos des Traums dann durch Platon (Politeia, Phaidon, Timaios) und besonders durch Aristoteles (De somno et vigilia; De insomniis) untersucht; eine systematische Auseinandersetzung findet sich dann in dem fünfbändigen Traumbuch (Oneirokritika) des antiken Traumdeuters Artemidor von Daldis, das sich bis in die Renaissance hinein besonderer Beliebtheit erfreute und noch von Freud zitiert wird. Was verstand man im Laufe der Zeit jeweils unter Träumen, und welche Rolle kam ihnen in Bezug auf die Philosophie zu? Wie lassen sich Träume verstehen bzw. interpretieren? Und schließlich: Wie lässt sich über Träume als anthropologische Konstante urteilen? Diesen Fragen soll im Rahmen dieses Q-Teams nachgegangen werden.

Hierfür werden einige wichtige Stationen dieses Nachdenkens über Träume nachgezeichnet, die von der Antike (Mythologie, Hesiod, Homer, Platon, Aristoteles, Artemidor, Cicero, Lukian) über das Mittelalter (Augustinus, Ibn Sīrīn) bis hin zur (frühen) Neuzeit (Descartes, Locke, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bergson) reichen. Neben Schriften der Philosophie sollen dabei auch wichtige Traumszenen in der Literatur (Shakespeare, Calderón, Goethe, Hoffmann, Jean Paul, Baudelaire, Carroll, Gogol, Dostojevskij, Rimbaud, Kafka, Borges et al.), in der bildenden Kunst (Bosch, Friedrich, Goya, Breton und der Surrealismus), im Film (Murnau, Lynch, Nolan, Gondry) und in der Musik (Beethoven, Schubert, Wagner) für die Entwicklung einer eigenen Forschungsfrage in Betracht gezogen werden. Die Ergebnisse dieses Q-Teams sollen am Ende des Semesters im Rahmen eines eintägigen Workshops präsentiert werden. Dieses Q-Team kann je nach Präferenz in Deutsch oder Englisch geführt werden.

→Agnes

Lo Presti, Roberto: Aristoteles, Physik I und II (HS)

Die Physik ist das Werk, in dem Aristoteles die methodologischen und theoretischen Grundlagen einer wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnis der Naturwelt setzt und sich mit der Definition der grundsätzlichsten Begriffe auseinandersetzt, wodurch sich die innere Struktur der Naturvorgänge und Naturphänomene begreifen, erkennen und erklären lässt. In dieser Hinsicht stellen die Physika-Bücher das Fundament dar, worauf beruhend sich die ganze Naturphilosophie des Aristoteles entwickelt. Keiner, der in die aristotelische Naturphilosophie eingehen möchte, darf auf eine aufmerksame und nähere Betrachtung der Physik verzichten.

In diesem Hauptseminar werden wir uns mit ausgewählten Kapiteln der ersten zwei Bücher der Physik auseinandersetzen und mit den zwei Hauptthemen, die in diesen Büchern behandelt werden, und zwar mit der Definition der Begriffe „Materie“ (hule) und „Natur“ (physis).

Vom ersten Buch werden das Kapitel 1, in dem Aristoteles die methodologischen Grundprinzipien seiner wissenschaftlichen Betrachtung der Naturwelt erörtert, und die Kap. 7-9, in denen die aristotelische Definition von „Materie“ geboten und theoretisch begründet wird, betrachtet werden. Aus zeitlichen Gründen werden wir auf die systematische Betrachtung der Kapitel, in denen Aristoteles die unterschiedlichen Prinzipienlehren der früheren Naturphilosophen kritisiert und ablehnt, verzichten müssen; wir werden aber versuchen zumindest die Kernpunkte der aristotelischen Kritik an die Vorgänger durch die Betrachtung seiner eigenen Prinzipien- und Materielehre zu gewinnen.

Der Betrachtung des ganzen zweiten Buches der Physik werden wir den Rest des Seminars widmen. Diese Betrachtung wird um vier theoretische Schwerpunkte drehen: Die Definition des „Physis“-Begriffes; die Erörterung der Vier-Ursachen-Lehre; die theoretische und erkenntnistheoretische Bedeutung der Zweckursache und ihre besondere Funktion innerhalb der Vier-Ursachen-Lehre; die Unterscheidung zwischen Physis, Ananke (Notwedigkeit), Zufall (Tyche) und Spontaneität (Automaton).

Literatur

Aristoteles, Physikvorlesung, hrsg. von Ernst Grumach, Berlin: De Gruyter, 1989 (nur deutsch)

Aristoteles, Physik (Bücher I-IV), hrsg. von Hans Günter Zekl, Hamburg: Meiner Verlag, 1987 (griechisch-deutsch)

Aristotle, Physics I and II, transl. with introduction and commentary by W. Charlton, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992

Eine vollständige Literaturliste wird am Anfang des Seminars zur Verfügung gestellt.

→Agnes

Menn, Stephen: Ancient Philosophy (CO)

Topics in ancient (Greek) and medieval (Arabic and Latin) philosophy and science. Intended for students specializing in ancient or medieval philosophy or science; presentations by students and visitors. This will be the regular colloquium of the Graduate School in Ancient Philosophy/Research Training Group "Philosophy, Science and the Sciences" in Summer 2019. Some blocks of time may be devoted to reading through texts together or to discussions of work in progress by the professor or visitors.

Language will normally be English. Students other than GSAP/RTG students who wish to participate should contact Stephen Menn, stephen.menn@ancient-philosophy.de, ahead of time.

→Agnes

Schmitt, Johanna: Einführung in Pyrrhonische Skepsis (PS)

In diesem Proseminar werden wir die ersten Kapitel in Sextus Empirikus’ ‚Grundriss der Pyrrhonischen Skepsis‘ lesen. Hierbei werden wir uns darauf konzentrieren zu verstehen, was pyrrhonische Skepsis ist und wie sich diese philosophische Haltung von anderen philosophischen Haltungen unterscheidet. Um dies zu tun, werden wir bestimmte Kernaussagen von Sextus diskutieren, wie zum Beispiel, dass pyrrhonische Skepsis eine Fähigkeit ist (und nicht nur einfach eine Theorie), dass der pyrrhonische Skeptiker ‚Dogmen’ ablehnt, und dass es die Fähigkeit zur Skepsis ist, die uns zu Seelenruhe führt.

Der Text wird zur Verfügung gestellt.

→Agnes

Wilberding, James: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)

The focus of this colloquium, which will be held in English, will be Plotinus’ Ennead 6.8 [treatise 39] on free will, autonomy and the One. We will read this text in the original Greek, very closely, and discuss different possible translations and philosophical interpretations. We will be beginning with chapter 9. Participants are expected to have some knowledge of ancient Greek, and to have read the entire treatise at least once prior to the start of the semester.

 

The following literature is recommended:

Henry and H.-R. Schwyzer. Plotini Opera. Volume 3. Clarendon, Oxford. This is the text we will be working with.

A.H. Armstrong. Plotinus. Enneads. 7 volumes. Loeb Classical Library.

Beutler, Theiler and Harder. Plotins Schriften. 6 volumes. Meiner Verlag.

Gerson et al. Plotinus. The Enneads. Cambridge UP.

The French translation with extensive notes by L. Lavaud in L. Brisson and J-F. Pradeau (eds) Plotin Traités. GF Flammarion.

George Leroux. Plotin. Traité sur la liberté et la volonté de l’Un [Ennéade VI,8 (39)]. J. Vrin, 1990. 

K. Corrigan and J.D. Turner. Plotinus. Ennead VI.8. On the Voluntary and on the Free Will of the One. Parmenides Press, 2017

→Agnes

Wilberding, James: Platons Politeia (PS)

Platons Politeia gehört zu den bedeutendsten und einflussreichsten Texten der Philosophiegeschichte. In diesem umfangreichen Werk plädiert Platon für eine auf den ersten Blick nicht ganz eingängige These, nämlich dass moralisches Handeln notwendigerweise zur eigenen Glückseligkeit führt. Bei der Erörterung dieser These wird nicht nur eine ausführliche Moraltheorie aufgebaut, denn darüber hinaus werden zahlreiche andere Kernthemen der Philosophie behandelt, u. a. Staatstheorie, Moralpsychologie, Erziehungstheorie, Metaphysik, und Erkenntnistheorie.

Empfohlene Übersetzung (Zur Ermöglichung einer fruchtbaren Diskussion ist vor allem zu beachten, dass die Übersetzung die sogenannte Stephanus-Paginierung (327-627 samt den Unterteilungen in die Buchstaben A,B,C,D und E) enthält): Platon. Der Staat. Übersetzt von O. Apelt. Meiner 1989 (Philosophische Bibliothek, Bd.80)

Zur vorbereitenden Lektüre empfehle ich:

Annas: An Introduction to Plato’s Republic, Oxford 1981

Erler: Platon. München.

Höffe (Hrsg.): Platon, Politeia, Berlin 1997 (Klassiker Auslegen, Bd.7)

Santas (Hrsg.): The Blackwell Guide to Plato’s Republic. Oxford: Blackwell 2006

Chr. Schäfer (Hrsg.): Platon-Lexikon. Darmstadt.

N.P. White. A Companion to Plato’s Republic. Indianapolis: Hackett 1979

Im Seminar werden wir den Text gründlich lesen und in Verbindung mit geeigneter Sekundärliteratur diskutieren. Keine besonderen Vorkenntnisse sind erforderlich, auch keine in Griechisch.

→Agnes

Wilberding, James: Plato’s Timaeus (HS)

Plato‘s Timaeus is one of the most influential – and difficult – texts in the history of philosophy. Here Plato presents his philosophy of nature, which serves as a means for further developing many other areas of his philosophical system, including metaphysics, theology, psychology and even ethics. The interpretation of this text was a hot topic of debate even in antiquity. To take just one example: Plato describes God creating the sensible world – comparable in some respects to the divine creation of the world in the book of Genesis – but many scholars (then as now) believe that this descripting is merely a didactic measure and that Plato genuinely believes that the sensible world has always existed. In this seminar we shall discuss this and many other issues, while carefully reading the text in its entirety.

All participants are expected to have read the Timaeus at least once before the start of the semester.

The recommended translation is: D.J. Zeyl.  Plato. Timaeus.  Hackett 2000.

For background and analysis the following studies are recommended:

R.D. Archer-Hind.  The Timaeus of Plato.  Macmillan 1888.

S. Broadie. Nature and Divinity in Plato’s Timaeus. Cambridge 2012.

F.M. Cornford.  Plato’s Cosmology.  Routledge 1935.

T.K. Johansen.  Plato’s Natural Philosophy.  A study of the Timaeus-Critias.  Cambridge 2004.

A.E. Taylor.  A Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus.  Oxford 1928.

The seminar will be held in English. No knowledge of ancient Greek is required, but the Greek text will occasionally be discussed.

→Agnes