Direkt zum InhaltDirekt zur SucheDirekt zur Navigation
▼ Zielgruppen ▼
  audience-menu

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Philosophy, Science and the Sciences

Winter semester 2017/18

This is a selection of courses offered by faculty of "Philosophy, Science and the Sciences". The regular forum for the doctoral students of the Research Training Group and the Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy is Jonathan Beere's Philosophical Colloquium, complemented by the Dissertation Seminar of David Ebrey.

The course list represents a variety of topics that are related to different research fields within the program. Please select your courses in accordance with your dissertation project and your supervisors.

 

Asper, Markus: Forschungskolloquium Gräzistik (CO)
Mon 12-2 pm, as of Oct 23 (bi-weekly); Unter den Linden 6, room 3052

Beere, Jonathan: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)
Wed 10-12:30, as of Oct 18; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Beere, Jonathan (mit Acerbi, Fabio): Language and Reasoning in Greek Mathematics (HS)
Thu 10-12, as of Oct 19; Invalidenstraße 110, Seminar- und Unterrichtsraum

Beere, Jonathan: Einführung in Platons theoretische Philosophie (V)
Tue 10-12, as of Oct 17; Unter den Linden 6, room 2094

Beere, Jonathan: Platons theoretische Philosophie (PS)
Tue 12-4 pm, as of Oct 17; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Bjelde, Joseph: Plato’s Statesman (HS)
Tue 10-12, as of Oct 17; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Bjelde, Joseph: Philosophical Writing (Ü)
Mon 2-4 pm, as of Oct 23; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Bjelde, Joseph / Moore Richard: Teaching and Human Development (block seminar)
Oct 4-6, 9:15 am - 5:45 pm; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Bjelde, Joseph / Moore Richard: Reasoning and Persuasion (block seminar)
Feb 26-28, 9:15 am - 5:45 pm; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Ebrey, David: Dissertation Seminar
Fri 10-12, as of Oct 20; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Ebrey, David: Plato’s Phaedo (HS)
Thu 2-4 pm, as of Oct 19; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 3.03

Graßhoff, Gerd / Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)
Mon 6-8 pm, as of Oct 23; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03

Graßhoff, Gerd: Schreiben und Argumentieren (Ü)
Tue 12-3 pm, as of Oct 17; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03

Lo Presti, Roberto: Aristoteles, De anima (HS)
Mon 4-6 pm, as of Oct 23; Unter den Linden 6, room 3053

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Astronomy and Astrology in Antiquity (V)
Mon 10-12, as of Oct 23; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Cosmogony and Creation of Man in the Ancient Near East (PS)
Wed 10-12, as of Oct 18; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Methoden der mesopotamischen Mathematik (HS)
Mon 4-6 pm, as of Oct 23; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.03

Pfeiffer, Christian: Doktorandenkolloquium (CO)
Wed 4-6:30 pm, as of Oct 18; Hannoversche Straße 6, room 1.24

Pfeiffer, Christian: Antike Handlungstheorie (PS)
Thu 2-4 pm, as of Oct 19; Invalidenstraße 110, Seminar- und Unterrichtsraum

Pfeiffer, Christian: Aristoteles' Substanztheorie (HS)
Thu 4-6 pm, as of Oct 19; Invalidenstraße 110, Seminar- und Unterrichtsraum

Pfeiffer, Christian: Aristoteles' Theoretische Philosophie (V)
Fri 10-12, as of Oct 20; Unter den Linden 6, room 2097

Thumiger, Chiara (substituting Philip van der Eijk): Colloquium Ancient Medicine (CO)
Mon 10-12, as of Oct 23; Unter den Linden 6, room 3053

 

Asper, Markus: Forschungskolloquium Gräzistik (CO)

Das Kolloquium dient als eine thematisch offene Diskussionsplattform für alle, die Qualifikationsarbeiten (ab MA) mit gräzistischen Themen schreiben – oder die sonst über gräzistische Fragen forschen. Das Kolloquium findet zweiwöchentlich statt.

→Agnes

Beere, Jonathan: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)

Short description will follow soon

→Agnes

Beere, Jonathan (mit Acerbi, Fabio): Language and Reasoning in Greek Mathematics (HS)

This course focuses on the question: how is the reasoning in Greek mathematical texts to be understood? This question is a philosophical one, because it is a particular case of the question how reasoning, as expressed in natural language, is to be understood. We will focus on the language of Euclid's Elements. How does it convey the logical structure of proof? There is a complex network of similarities to, and differences fcontemporary mathematical practice. For instance, (most) Greek mathematical texts avoid all explicit discussion of themselves (expressions such as, "In theorem XYZ, . . ."). This makes the question of how to interpret the inferences in the Greek texts both interesting and tricky. One prominent problem, which we will discuss, is how to understand the generality of the proofs. Most interpreters understand Greek mathematical proofs as first establishing something about a particular item and then inferring that it is true for all items of a certain sort. (E.g., this triangle has angles equal to two right angles. Therefore all triangles have angles equal to two right angles.) Do the Greek mathematicians really make such inferences from particular to general? If so, how are they to be understood? If not, how is the language that appears to draw such inferences to be understood?

Our main mathematical text will be Euclid's Elements. We will also compare it with less familiar mathematical works (e.g., Heron). We will also draw on a range of ancient and contemporary philosophical texts, such as Stoic logic, Wittgenstein, and Kit Fine.

We will not presuppose knowledge of Greek, nor of Greek mathematics. Participants are required to have completed a course in logic. Some previous exposure to ancient philosophy and/or some general knowledge of mathematics will be useful. Language of instruction: English. (Hausarbeiten may be written in German.)

→Agnes

Beere, Jonathan: Einführung in Platons theoretische Philosophie (V)

In diesem Kurs werden wir uns einen einführenden Überlick über Platons theoretische Philosphie verschaffen. Was sind platonische Formen? Weswegen nimmt Platon sie an und sind seine Gründe dafür gut? Was ist laut Platon Wissen und wovon gibt es Wissen? Wie verhält sich Wissen zu Wahrnehmung bzw. Formen zu wahrnehmbaren Gegenständen? Wir werden mehrere Texte entweder ganz oder zum Teil lesen, z.B. Menon, Phaidon, Politeia, Parmenides und Sophistes.

→Agnes

Beere, Jonathan: Platons theoretische Philosophie (PS)

In diesem Proseminar werden wir einen einzigen Text von der entsprechenden Vorlesung intensiv lesen und diskutieren. Teilnahme an der Vorlesung wird vorausgesetzt.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Plato’s Statesman (HS)

This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of Plato’s Statesman, in which the cast of Plato’s Sophist reappear to discuss the political art, with rather different views than a reader of Plato’s Republic might expect. But the dialogue is at least as important a source for Plato’s conception of what philosophers do – though it is far from clear what conception that is.

No previous coursework in ancient philosophy will be presupposed, but the seminar will be hard going for students who have not read and thought seriously about both Plato’s Republic and Sophist. Nor is knowledge of ancient Greek required. The seminar will be primarily in English, though participants who feel more comfortable contributing in German are very welcome.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph: Philosophical Writing (Ü)

The goal of this course is to help students improve their philosophical writing in English, especially the presentation and discussion of arguments. To that end, we will discuss some especially interesting, influential, and difficult arguments, including: Zeno's paradox, Newcomb's paradox, Moore's (so called) paradox, Plato's argument for the division of the soul, Alex Byrne's argument for internal world skepticism, moral arguments for vegetarianism and for giving (a lot!) to charity, as well as companions in guilt arguments against moral error theory.

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph / Moore Richard: Teaching and Human Development (block seminar)

What is teaching, and how is it significant for human life? This blockseminar will explore those questions, drawing on recent work as well as ancient Greek texts, which proceed from very different starting points to very different answers. For instance, recent work in cognitive science argues that an ability to pass on complicated skills and information to others has been fundamental to the survival and development of the human race, because it enables both rapid adaptation to a changing environment, and the development of uniquely human social institutions. Plato, on the other hand, thinks of teaching as an (almost?) impossible ideal, reaching far beyond the mere imparting of skills and information with survival value, and finds its importance in the way it would help navigate social institutions as they now are. By setting these two strands of thought next to each other in this seminar, we hope to get clearer not just on the answers to the questions above, but also on what’s at stake in answering them.

Background reading for the interested:

Plato. The Meno.

Moore, R. (2016). Pedagogy and social learning in human development. In J. Kiverstein (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of the Social Mind. London: Routledge, pp.35-52.

Please note that this seminar is intended to complement our blockseminar “Reasoning and Persuasion”, which will be taught in February; if the course is oversubscribed, preference will be given to participants registering for both seminars. Participants will be expected to have prepared for the blockseminar in advance of its start, and students should register on the course Moodle as soon as possible.

Moodle password: teaching2017

→Agnes

Bjelde, Joseph / Moore Richard: Reasoning and Persuasion (block seminar)

What role does persuasion play in understanding how we do or should think? Is persuasiveness something we have evolved to strive for, at the expense of good reasoning, as some recent work in cognitive science suggests? Or is persuasiveness in fact very closely tied to rationality, as some ancient Greek thinkers thought? This blockseminar will be devoted to discussing these questions (inter alia) about the relationship between reasoning and persuasion, with readings drawn both from contemporary cognitive science, as well as ancient Greek rhetoric and philosophy.

Key text: Mercier, H & Sperber, D. (2017) The Enigma of Reason. Harvard UP. All students should get their own copy of this.

Please note that this seminar is intended to complement our blockseminar “Teaching” which will be taught in October; if the course is oversubscribed, preference will be given to participants registering for both seminars. Participants will be expected to have prepared for the blockseminar in advance of its start, and students should register on the course Moodle as soon as possible.

Moodle password: reasoning2017

→Agnes

Ebrey, David: Dissertation Seminar

This seminar is designed as a forum for all doctoral students of the Research Training Group “Philosophy, Science and the Sciences” and the Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy to present and discuss their work.

Ebrey, David: Plato’s Phaedo (HS)

In this seminar we will carefully work through Plato’s Phaedo, which discusses ethical, epistemological, and metaphysical ideas that at the heart of Plato’s philosophy. Topics covered include: causation, the nature of the soul, the problems caused by the body, how inquiry is possible, the proper attitude and methodology for inquiry, why (and in what sense) the forms are distinct from sensible things, and why the best life is spent contemplating the forms. We will also discuss how the literary elements of the dialogue are related to its philosophical ideas.

The seminar will be in English and will assume basic familiarity with Plato’s works. Knowledge of Greek is not required, but we will occasionally discuss the Greek, as needed.

→Agnes

Graßhoff, Gerd / Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Philosophical Colloquium (CO)

Im Kolloquium zur Wissenschaftstheorie und Wissenschaftsgeschichte haben die Teilnehmer die Gelegenheit, die Ergebnisse von Studienprojekten, Hausarbeitsentwürfen und Projekten vorzustellen. In einzelnen Sitzungen werden gemeinsam aktuelle Publikationen aus dem gesamten Forschungsfeld diskutiert.

In der ersten Sitzung werden die Termine mit den Präsentationen vergeben; bitte klären Sie Ihre Themenvorschläge einen Monat vor Beginn des Semesters per E-Mail mit mir (Prof. Dr. Gerd Graßhoff) ab.

→Agnes

Graßhoff, Gerd: Schreiben und Argumentieren (Ü)

Die philosophische Schreibwerkstatt findet in drei Gruppen à 7 Studenten/innen statt. Die Teilnehmer/innen verfassen wöchentlich kleine Essays zu philosophischen Fragestellungen, die in den Sitzungen vorgetragen und anschließend im Kurs diskutiert und vom Kursleiter beurteilt werden. Jeder Studierende hat pro Woche einen Essay einzureichen.

Die Übung findet in drei Blöcken, von 12-13, 13-14 und 14-15 Uhr statt. Pro Sitzung können maximal 7 Studierende teilnehmen.

Die Anmeldung für den Kurs muss vor Beginn des Wintersemesters per E-Mail erfolgen; E-Mail bitte an: kerstin.rumpeltes@topoi.org oder kerstin.rumpeltes.1@hu-berlin.de

Agnes

Lo Presti, Roberto: Aristoteles, De anima (HS)

Die Schrift De anima (Über die Seele) ist ohne Zweifel ein der berühmtesten und bedeutungsvollsten Werke des Aristoteles. Mit dieser Schrift gründet Aristoteles eine philosophische Psychologie, in dem er eine theoretische, und in diesem Sinne, wissenschaftliche Betrachtung der Seele deren Vermögen und Tätigkeiten anbietet. Hier wird die Seele als diejenige Entität behandelt, die bewirkt, dass einem natürlichen Körper das Prädikat „lebendig“ zugesprochen werden kann. Das Werk besteht aus drei Büchern. Das erste enthält eine philosophische Kritik, die Aristoteles gegen die Seelenauffassungen seiner Vorgänger richtet. Von dieser Kritik ausgehend entfaltet Aristoteles im zweiten Buch unterschiedliche und immer genauere Definitionen der Seele und fokussiert auf die Vermögen, die zum vegetativen und sensitiven Seelenteil gehören. Im dritten Buch werden vor allem das Vorstellungs- und das Denkvermögen zur Sprache gebracht. Im Seminar werden wir das erste Buch nur summarisch betrachten und unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf das zweite und das dritte Buch richten.

Das Seminar wird stark diskussionsorientiert sein und setzt deshalb eine aktive Teilnahme voraus. Es wird erwartet, dass alle Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer im Laufe des Semesters zumindest ein Referat halten, und selbstverständlich sollen auch alle mit Fragen und Beiträgen regelmäßig zur Diskussion beitragen.

Die Kenntnis der griechischen Sprache ist willkommen, aber nicht erforderlich. Wir werden den aristotelischen Text in deutscher Übersetzung lesen, wobei wir auf den griechischen Text in systematischer Weise verweisen werden, um Kernbegriffe zu verdeutlichen und theoretisch relevante textuelle Schwierigkeiten bzw. Unklarheiten zur Sprache zu bringen.

Eine vollständige Primär- und Sekundärliteraturliste wird in der ersten Seminarsitzung zur Verfügung gestellt.

→Agnes

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Astronomy and Astrology in Antiquity (V)

In dieser Vorlesung werden zentrale Themenbereiche der antiken Astronomie und Astrologie aus den Kulturen des östlichen Mittelmeerraumes besprochen (Ägypten, Griechenland, Mesopotamien, Rom). Im Zentrum stehen die zur Verfügung stehenden schriftlichen und materiellen Originalquellen und die daraus rekonstruierten astronomischen und astrologischen Theorien, Konzepte und Praktiken.

→Agnes

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Cosmogony and Creation of Man in the Ancient Near East (PS)

In diesem Proseminar werden altorientalischen Mythen und Vorstellungen über die Entstehung der Welt und die Erschaffung des Menschen und seine Rolle im Kosmos besprochen und analysiert. Dies geschieht auf der Basis von aktuellen deutschen und englischen Übersetzungen und Kommentaren. Darunter sind "Enki und die Weltordnung", "Atrahasis" (der "babylonische Noah") und "Als Oben" (der "babylonische Schöpfungsmythos"). Folgende inhaltliche, wissenschaftshistorische und kontextuelle Fragen werden im Vordergrund stehen:

Was sind die Anfangs- und Endzustände des Kosmos, wie verlaufen die

Schöpfungsvorgänge, welche Konzepte und Prinzipien liegen dem Kosmos zugrunde? Wer sind die Akteure? Wie wird die Existenz des Menschen erklärt?

Welches Menschbild liegt den Schöpfungsberichten zugrunde? Was ist der theologische und ideologische Kontext der Mythen? Welche Schöpfungserzählungen und Motive sind auch in benachbarten Kulturen (Syrien/Palästina, Griechenland) belegt? Nach einer Einführung soll jede(r) Teilnehmer(in) über einen Mythos(-Abschnitt) ein kurzes Referat halten.

Anschließend wird darüber diskutiert. Kenntnisse der mesopotamischen Kultur werden nicht vorausgesetzt.

→Agnes

Ossendrijver, Matthieu: Methoden der mesopotamischen Mathematik (HS)

Mathematische Schultexte, Problemtexte und Tabellen aus Babylonien (2000-100 v. Chr.) belegen eine Vielzahl von Rechenmethoden und Lösungsverfahren. Obwohl diese in der Regel als konkrete numerische Beispiele formuliert sind, implizieren sie allgemeinere Verfahren. In diesem Hauptseminar werden selektierte Schultexte, Problemtexte sowie tabellarische Texte in Übersetzung analysiert und besprochen. Das Ziel ist, einige wichtige Methoden und Verfahren der babylonischen Schulmathematik zu rekonstruieren. In den Sitzungen wird nach und nach der babylonische Mathematikunterricht abgedeckt, von Addition, Multiplikation, Division hin zu Lösungsverfahren einfacher Probleme. Nach einer Einführung soll jede(r) Teilnehmer(in) über ein Textbeispiel ein Kurzreferat halten. Anschließend wird darüber diskutiert. Gewisse elementare mathematische Kenntnisse sind wünschenswert; Kenntnisse der mesopotamischen Kultur werden nicht vorausgesetzt.

→Agnes

Pfeiffer, Christian: Doktorandenkolloquium (CO)

Das Kolloquium wendet sich an Doktoranden bzw. fortgeschrittene MA-Studierende in der Antiken Philosophie. Es sollen neueste Arbeiten zu ausgewählten Themen der Antiken Philosophie gelesen werden. Des Weiteren dient es auch der gemeinsamen Diskussion und Lektüre von Texten aus den jeweiligen Arbeitsgebieten der Teilnehmer*innen.  
Um Voranmeldung wird gebeten (pfeiffer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de).

→Agnes

Pfeiffer, Christian: Antike Handlungstheorie (PS)

Auch wenn Handlungen kein eigenständiges Thema der antiken Philosophie darstellen, äußern sich antike Autoren in unterschiedlichen Kontexten zu Fragen, die wir heute der Handlungstheorie zuordnen würden. Dazu gehören: 1. Wie verhalten sich Wissen und Handeln zueinander? 2. Wie lassen sich motivationale Konflikte erklären? 3. Wie lassen sich Handlungen innerhalb eines naturphilosophischen Rahmens (einer allgemeinen Theorie der Bewegung) beschreiben? 4. Unter welchen Umständen können Handlungen als Ausdruck von Charaktereigenschaften gelten? 5. Wie passen (freie) Handlungen in ein deterministisches Weltbild? Wir wollen diese und  weitere Fragen mit Blick auf ausgewählte Philosophen (Sokrates, Platon, Aristoteles, Stoiker) diskutieren. Im Zentrum wird dabei die gemeinsame Textlektüre stehen.

→Agnes

Pfeiffer, Christian: Aristoteles' Substanztheorie (HS)

Aristoteles bezeichnet die ontologisch grundlegenden Dinge als Substanzen (ousiai).  In diesem Seminar werden wir anhand ausgewählter Passagen aus der Kategorienschrift sowie den Büchern VII und VIII der Metaphysik versuchen, Aristoteles' Antwort auf folgende Fragen  zu rekonstruieren:  In welchem Sinne sind Substanzen ontologisch vorrangig? Wie sind die verschiedenen Charakterisierungen der Substanz, u.a. als Zugrundeliegendes oder als ein bestimmtes Dieses, zu verstehen? Wie ist das Verhältnis der Substanztheorie in den Kategorien zu der Theorie der Metaphysik? In der Metaphysik werden konkrete Einzeldinge als ontologisch komplex, bestehend aus Form und Materie, behandelt. Wie ist das zu verstehen?

→Agnes

Pfeiffer, Christian: Aristoteles' Theoretische Philosophie (V)

Die Vorlesung ist eine Einführung in Aristoteles' theoretische Philosophie. Es werden drei Themenblöcke behandelt: 1. Logik, Semantik, Wissenschaftstheorie.  2. Naturphilosophie. 3. Metaphysik und Ontologie.  Das Ziel der Vorlesung ist es Aristoteles' wichtigste  Ansichten in jedem dieser Gebiete darzustellen. Auszüge aus dem Organon, der Metaphysik, der Physik und De Anima werden die Textbasis für die Vorlesung bilden.

→Agnes

Thumiger, Chiara (substituting Philip van der Eijk): Colloquium Ancient Medicine (CO)

In diesem Kolloquium werden wir verschiedene Aspekte der antiken Medizin und ihre Beziehung zur antiken Philosophie, Literatur und Kulturgeschichte betrachten. Studierende und Kolleginnen und Kollegen haben die Möglichkeit, ihre Forschung zu präsentieren; in manchen Wochen werden eingeladene WissenschaftlerInnen vortragen. Bei Interesse melden Sie sich bei Chiara Thumiger: chiara.thumiger@hu-berlin.de.

In this weekly colloquium we will consider aspects of ancient medicine in its relationship with ancient philosophy, literature and cultural history. Students will have the opportunity to present work in progress; there will also be presentations by visiting speakers. Those interested in participating are asked to contact Chiara Thumiger, chiara.thumiger@hu-berlin.de.

→Agnes